Mobology

In late 2002 I noted a great deal of movement in the ed-tech space where people were avidly debating the onset of learning management systems. Later in 2005 amidst the flurry of flights this:

Die LMS die!

I was more interested (obsessed might be a better description) and I still am with where the onset of wearable technologies take us. Mobile phones were in use in the cars when we apprehended kids with FACS as far back as 1998.

My Nokia brick phone soon after let me take calls in the field. I was the only person I know at the time spending 1/5th of my wages in phone calls. Testing the grid. Pinging data through to Glogger.mobi 

Then MMS packet moblogging with Joi Ito arrived. SMS was rampant by 2003 and the ringtone business was booming. Makes me smile when I think of how advanced we thought we were in creating and hacking into our handsets to have our own ringtones.

Skype was in play. I graduated from the brick phone to the flip phone. My kids loved the little Samsung Flip as it had great games on it. I traded my DJ Stanton Decks (what an idiot) in to get my hands on a 02 XDA PDA.

I gave birth to the Australian Mobile Learning Network (AMLN). We travelled and presented a paper in South Africa at the premier mobile learning conference - mLearn.

My LiveJournal account got hacked. All I can now find is the last entires in 2006. Three years of writing lost - boo!

I was building websites using HTML. PHP. Eeeeek....even Flash !

I owned every imaginable computer till I got that first laptop. I began building websites with the kids for fun, using Frontpage as part of their curriculum - http://scys.iinet.net.au

I'd built pneumatic controllers with Stellarc powering thing across the internet and the Fire Station event and loved participating in Victoria Vesna's 'No Time' web installation. Ric Rue. Rob Muir. Ian Lamb....god how I miss those Club Zho gigs. Drinking Ouzo and swooning away to Kat Hope, Lindsay and co.

Suddenly the whole world was connected up. Everything started speeding up.

We built an Invisible City together - http://www.pica.org.au/view/Invisible+Cities/238/

My Creative Doctorate at Curtin University was in full swing. I was a fellow editor of a Faculty journal. I began public speaking and exhibiting all over the place. I've lost count of how many things I was involved in but remember fondly my days and rabid nights as a member of the Wellman Street Studio in Northbridge, Western Australia.

Our studio shared a common wall with a brothel. Nuff' said.

With a fellow sound artist we built and toured an installation made of 44 gallon drums through urban, rural and remote communities in Western Australia - https://archive.org/details/01032003Project44Concepts

Someone spotted me using SMS with my students. I was invited to participate in a research project using SMS with 'disengaged' kids. The Australian Learning Framework - AFLF.

I travelled far and wide. Particularly through the Pilbarra regions of Western Australia. Newman even. Then my dreams came true - Punmu, Jiglaong, Parnngurr communities.

I'd also hit pay dirt by hanging out in London with the Moblog.co.uk crew. Rural and remote communities for longer stints. Mobdeadly. Limitlessness.

I'd begun moblogging my entire existence - http://moblog.net/alexanderhayes/

It took me all around the world. Party. party, party. I lost contact with lots of reality and started going full cyborg.

We lost our baby. I pulled out of the Creative Doctorate. Things started falling apart. Middle child moves to Melbourne.

I got noticed and donned a suit (bad mistake) and started going public with my views in public presentations on the architectures of educative arrangement - the dawning of mobology - learning in the hand - a networked handheld computer, worn.

All we proved was that the notion of young people being disengaged yet they had a phone in their hand itself was false. They were highly engaged...it was the architectures of the education system sadly lagging behind.

I started hanging out online with the TALO crowd - https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/teachandlearnonline

My Father had a stroke.